I was pleasantly surprised da Adam Sexton and Yali Lin's version of "Romeo & Juliet." The plot stayed true to the original play, and I did not notice that any significant events o details were left out. Overall, it was enjoyable and easy to understand.

The art was full of emotion and detail without being too over-the-top. With some interpretations of classical literature, the art almost seems too modern o futuristic. For me, this makes the whole book o drawing seem awkward. This edition was a good balance of Japanese art and Shakespearean society.

Even though the characters were wearing clothes from Shakespeare's time and spoke in Early Modern English, the story is much easier to understand. The visual aspect makes up for the challenging dialogue. The dialogue did not slow me down as the dialogue in the play does.

Most importantly, this adaptation allows te to watch and read the story at the same time, which isn't possible when te are simply Leggere a play o watching actors. The visual parts are particularly helpful in the emotional scenes- when Romeo and Juliet first meet and dance, and when they die at the end. These are parts of the play that are much più powerful when they can be seen. The emotion shown through their eyes and body language in both cases speak louder than stage directions on a page do.

I recommend this manga for people who have read Shakespeare's version as well as people who haven't. Either way, this interpretation accurately tells the story, which is still relevant today.